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Sunday, 12 March 2017

What We're Watching 12/3/17


What We're Watching
12/3/17


Yesterday was a busy and also not especially brilliant day, so this post is, regrettably, a day late. Still, we've been watching some interesting stuff, so let's take a moment to talk about three television shows.


Broadchurch S3.

Broadchurch remains one of the UK's great national successes, with its first series having become such talked about event television that spoiling people was considered to be a crime worthy of summary execution. The second series, while less well-received, was still plenty popular. We're now two episodes into the third series, currently being touted as the last series.

(Given that showrunner Chris Chibnall will shortly be going to work on Doctor Who, a show with a notoriously punishing schedule, I can believe it.)

So far, the third series lacks the electricity of the first, but is a marked improvement over the second, whose only real highlight was the court case plotline. Shifting the focus away from murder (for now), this series instead focuses on Ellie and Alex attempting to track down a rapist who might constitute a threat to the public. It's an interesting tack: The first and second series mostly shied away from the usual crime fiction tack of 'the criminal could strike again,' so it's a welcome variation to see a criminal who could (and probably will) harm someone else.

So far, I'm enjoying it a lot. I do definitely recommend it.


Hyouka.

I've only watched the first episode of Hyouka so far, and I was only sort of half watching it at that, but I've enjoyed what I've seen of it so far. It has a slick animation style, engaging characters, and an interesting if somewhat overused 'high school detectives' plot.

It wins points for the interesting altered-reality sections from main character Hotaro's viewpoint, where words flow over him like water, or deuteragonist Chitanda is seen with flowing hair and luminescent leaves around her, which are all very pretty to look at.


Powerless.

Powerless is a fun, light-hearted sitcom set in the DC Universe, following members of a branch of Waynetech devoted to making devices that keep people safe from the fallout between superheroes and supervillains. It's a tongue in cheek look at superhero tropes, which would be fine if that wasn't a concept that's been done to death.

The show is fun enough, but it leans a little too heavily on its DC roots, to the point where I can't help but wonder if the show would be more fun if it took place in a superhero universe of its own creation, rather than constantly making jokes about Batman.


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